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HomeEV & Battery2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Vs. Tesla Model Y: Are They Competitive?

2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Vs. Tesla Model Y: Are They Competitive?

As electrification progresses, there are more and more all-electric models on the market, each of which usually also has multiple versions or trim levels. This is a good thing but makes the comparison between the cars more complex – especially if the prices change frequently.

Today we will take a look at the two most popular all-electric crossover/SUV models in the United States – Tesla Model Y and Ford Mustang Mach-E, comparing the main elements of the offer (like price, range, etc.) as the foundation for future research.

The Ford Mustang Mach-E just recently received a price update, as well as a new LFP battery version, while in the case of Tesla, prices change almost weekly.

Prices

Let’s start with the prices. The Ford Mustang Mach-E’s price range (MSRP) is between $42,995 and $64,995, which after a $1,800 destination charge and deducting the $3,750 federal tax credit, is effectively $41,045-$63,045.

The Tesla Model Y starts at $47,240 and goes up to $54,240. Once we add the obligatory costs ($1,640) and deduct the $7,500 federal tax credit, the effective prices vary between $41,380 and $48,380.

Pricing appears to be the advantage of Tesla over Ford, except for the entry-level rear-wheel drive Mustang Mach-E, but let’s note that all Model Y are all-wheel drive.

Model Base Price Dest. Charge Tax Credit Effective Price
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Select SR LFP RWD 18-inch $42,995 +$1,800 $3,750 $41,045
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Select SR LFP AWD 18-inch $45,995 +$1,800 $3,750 $44,045
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium SR LFP RWD 19-inch $46,995 +$1,800 $3,750 $45,045
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium SR LFP AWD 19-inch $49,995 +$1,800 $3,750 $48,045
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium ER RWD 19-inch $53,995 +$1,800 $3,750 $52,045
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium ER AWD 19-inch $56,995 +$1,800 $3,750 $55,045
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Route 1 ER AWD 18-inch $56,995 +$1,800 $3,750 $55,045
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E GT ER AWD 20-inch $59,995 +$1,800 $3,750 $58,045
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E GT Perf. ER AWD 20-inch $64,995 +$1,800 $3,750 $63,045
2023 Tesla Model Y AWD (4680) 19-inch $47,240 +$1,640 $7,500 $41,380
2023 Tesla Model Y AWD (4680) 20-inch $49,240 +$1,640 $7,500 $43,380
2023 Tesla Model Y Long Range AWD 19-inch $50,240 +$1,640 $7,500 $44,380
2023 Tesla Model Y Long Range AWD 20-inch $52,240 +$1,640 $7,500 $46,380
2023 Tesla Model Y Perf. LR AWD 21-inch $54,240 +$1,640 $7,500 $48,380

* Tesla adds a Destination fee (DST) of $1,390 and an Order Fee of $250 to all its models ($1,640 total).

Basic specs

All Tesla Model Y versions currently available are all-wheel drive, while Ford offers a mix of rear- and all-wheel drive versions.

It’s difficult to compare the battery capacity of the two models because Tesla does not report the capacity, while Ford reports only the usable capacity (currently 72 kilowatt-hours in SR or 91 kWh in ER versions). The only thing we can say is that the general consensus is that Tesla has a lower battery capacity than Ford, but achieves more range through lower energy consumption/higher efficiency.

Speaking of range, depending on the version, the RWD Ford Mustang Mach-E gets 250 miles of EPA Combined range (SR version) or 310 miles (ER version). In the case of the AWD versions, it’s 226 miles (SR) or 260-312 miles (ER versions).

Meanwhile, the Tesla Model Y has a driving range from 279 miles up to 330 miles. In other words, the Tesla’s bracket appears to be slightly higher, when comparing the AWD to AWD, but of course, we need to check particular versions side-by-side, which we will do later in this post.

The third thing to compare is the acceleration from 0 to 60 miles per hour. It’s 3.5 to 6.3 seconds in the case of the Ford Mustang Mach-E (3.5-5.1 in AWD versions), and 3.5-5.0 seconds in the case of the Tesla Model Y. Very similar on paper. By the way, the numbers for Performance versions usually are “with rollout subtracted.”

Model Drive Battery
(kWh)
EPA
Range
0-60
mph
(sec)
Top
Speed
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Select SR LFP RWD 18-inch RWD 72* 250 mi*
(402 km)
6.3  
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Select SR LFP AWD 18-inch AWD 72* 226 mi*
(364 km)
5.1  
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium SR LFP RWD 19-inch RWD 72* 250 mi*
(402 km)
6.3  
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium SR LFP AWD 19-inch AWD 72* 226 mi*
(364 km)
5.1  
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium ER RWD 19-inch RWD 91* 310 mi
(499 km)
6.1  
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium ER AWD 19-inch AWD 91* 290 mi
(467 km)
4.8  
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Route 1 ER AWD 18-inch AWD 91* 312 mi
(502 km)
4.8  
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E GT ER AWD 20-inch AWD 91* 270 mi
(434 km)
3.8  
2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E GT Perf. ER AWD 20-inch AWD 91* 260 mi
(418 km)
3.5  
2023 Tesla Model Y AWD (4680) 19-inch AWD 68* 279 mi
(449 km)
5.0 135 mph
(217 km/h)
2023 Tesla Model Y AWD (4680) 20-inch AWD 68* 269 mi*
(433 km)
5.0 135 mph
(217 km/h)
2023 Tesla Model Y Long Range AWD 19-inch AWD 80* 330 mi
(531 km)
4.8 135 mph
(217 km/h)
2023 Tesla Model Y Long Range AWD 20-inch AWD 80* 318 mi*
(512 km)
4.8 135 mph
(217 km/h)
2023 Tesla Model Y Perf. LR AWD 21-inch AWD 80* 303 mi
(488 km)
3.5 155 mph
(249 km/h)

* Ford Mustang Mach-E battery capacity is usable capacity; Tesla Model Y battery capacity is just a rough estimation of total capacity (what to expect)

** some EPA range numbers are estimated/expected/unofficial values

Comparisons

With all of the basic data outlined, let’s now take a look at a few all-wheel drive versions, compared side-by-side, to better understand the differences and how competitive are the two cars.

The first pair is the entry-level AWD versions – the new Mach-E Select SR, equipped with Lithium Iron Phosphate (LFP) batteries, and the Tesla Model Y from Texas, equipped with 4680-type cylindrical battery cells (NCM, as far as we know).

As we can see below, the Ford Mustang Mach-E has slightly higher battery capacity (and that’s even when comparing the net value to Tesla’s estimated total) but offers a noticeably lower range – by one-fifth.

On the other hand, there is a chance that the LFP battery will allow charging up to 90-100 state-of-charge (SOC) daily, without sacrificing longevity, while in the case of the NCM, it’s usually advised not to fully recharge daily, especially if the additional range is not necessary (avoid sitting idle at 80-100 percent SOC). Anyway, we will have to wait for our InsideEVs’ 70 mph range test to get a better idea of what to expect in terms of real-world range.

Acceleration is basically the same and it will be difficult to distinguish the two on a daily basis. In the case of the Ford Mustang Mach-E, the issue (especially of the Performance versions) is that it does not offer peak power for too long, which limits the performance of repeatable acceleration.

In terms of DC fast charging, the Ford Mustang Mach-E with LFP battery is improved, because it can go up to 150 kilowatts (kW), but it’s still far behind the Tesla Model Y, which even in the entry-level version gets 230 kW. Access to the Tesla Supercharging network is another thing, although some of the stations were recently opened to non-Tesla vehicles in the US.

Another interesting thing is that the Ford Mustang Mach-E is noticeably heavier than the Tesla Model Y (by around 10 percent, according to the raw specs). That would explain why Tesla gets better efficiency and higher range.

Finally, pricing. The two cars are relatively close to each other in terms of MSRP, but because of the difference in the federal tax credit, the Tesla Model Y AWD actually becomes effectively less expensive than the Ford Mustang Mach-E Select SR LFP AWD.

EV Comparison Side-by-Side by InsideEVs
Model 2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Select SR LFP AWD 18-inch
[A]
Difference
[A] / [B]
2023 Tesla Model Y AWD (4680) 19-inch
[B]
Drive AWD   AWD
Battery 72 kWh* 5.9% 68 kWh*
EPA Range
Combined 226 mi*
(364 km)
-19% 279 mi
(449 km)
City     291.9 mi
(470 km)
Highway     263.3 mi
(424 km)
Specs
0-60 mph 5.1 s 2% 5 s
Top speed     135 mph
(217 km/h)
Peak power 232 kW    
EPA Energy Consumption (including charging losses)
Combined     123 MPGe: 274 Wh/mi (170 Wh/km)
City     129 MPGe: 261 Wh/mi (162 Wh/km)
Highway     116 MPGe: 291 Wh/mi (181 Wh/km)
Charging
DC Peak charging power: 150 kW
Info: 10-80% SOC in 33 min
  Peak charging power: 230 kW
Weight, Payload and Towing
Curb weight (est.) 4789 lbs (2172 kg) 9.8% 4363 lbs (1979 kg)
Prices
MSRP $45,995 -2.6% $47,240
Dest. Charge +$1,800   +$1,640
Tax Credit $3,750   $7,500
Effective Price $44,045 6.4% $41,380

Now, let’s move to the versions with higher battery capacity and range. The Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium ER AWD versus Tesla Model Y Long Range AWD.

Just like previously, it’s difficult to compare battery capacity (91 kWh net in the Mach-E, and probably around 80 kWh total in the case of the Model Y). Anyway, the Mach-E has noticeably more energy available. Both packs are high-nickel type (NCM Mach-E, and NCA Tesla Model Y, we believe).

Interestingly, the Tesla Model Y has some 12 percent more EPA Combined range (330 miles over 290 miles), and the difference is even higher on the highway (almost 15 percent).

It’s worth noting that according to EPA, the Ford Mustang Mach-E ER AWD energy consumption, including charging losses, is about 25 percent higher than Tesla Model Y LR AWD. Part of that might be the fact that the curb weight of the Mach-E is almost 11 percent higher.

Acceleration numbers are exactly the same. Fast charging is better in the Tesla Model Y (up to 250 kW plus access to the full Tesla Supercharging network).

The biggest issue for Ford Mustang Mach-E is that its MSRP price is higher than Tesla’s price by $6,000. Then we can also see a halved federal tax credit, and in effect, there is a massive $10,665 effective difference between the two.

EV Comparison Side-by-Side by InsideEVs
Model 2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium ER AWD 19-inch
[A]
Difference
[A] / [B]
2023 Tesla Model Y Long Range AWD 19-inch
[B]
Drive AWD   AWD
Battery 91 kWh* 13.8% 80 kWh*
EPA Range
Combined 290 mi
(467 km)
-12.1% 330 mi
(531 km)
City 306.6 mi
(493 km)
-10.4% 342.2 mi
(551 km)
Highway 268.6 mi
(432 km)
-14.9% 315.7 mi
(508 km)
Specs
0-60 mph 4.8 s 0% 4.8 s
Top speed     135 mph
(217 km/h)
Peak power 258 kW    
EPA Energy Consumption (including charging losses)
Combined 92 MPGe: 366 Wh/mi (228 Wh/km) -24.6% 122 MPGe: 276 Wh/mi (172 Wh/km)
City 97 MPGe: 347 Wh/mi (216 Wh/km) -23.6% 127 MPGe: 265 Wh/mi (165 Wh/km)
Highway 85 MPGe: 396 Wh/mi (246 Wh/km) -27.4% 117 MPGe: 288 Wh/mi (179 Wh/km)
Charging
DC Peak charging power: 150 kW
Info: 10-80% SOC in 45 min
  Peak charging power: 250 kW
Weight, Payload and Towing
Curb weight (est.) 4838 lbs (2195 kg) 10.9% 4363 lbs (1979 kg)
Prices
MSRP $56,995 13.4% $50,240
Dest. Charge +$1,800   +$1,640
Tax Credit $3,750   $7,500
Effective Price $55,045 24% $44,380

In the case of the performance-oriented versions (Mach-E GT Perf. ER AWD and Tesla Model Y Perf.), the main change over the previous part is higher power output of the vehicles, which is necessary to achieve 0-60 mph acceleration in 3.5 seconds.

Both cars can do it, but the specs indicate that the Mach-E also has a 14 percent lower EPA Combined range, despite a bigger battery (potentially by roughly 14 percent). That’s because the efficiency is lower by a quarter or so – with a big part due to a 14 percent higher curb weight.

Once again, the biggest issue appears to be the price – over $10,000 higher in the case of the Mach-E, even before deducting the federal tax credit, which elevates the difference to effectively $14,665 or 30 percent. Even if one would select the $5,000 less expensive Mustang Mach-E GT ER AWD, which accelerated 0-60 mph in 3.8 seconds, the price difference would still be relatively high.

EV Comparison Side-by-Side by InsideEVs
Model 2023 Ford Mustang Mach-E GT Perf. ER AWD 20-inch
[A]
Difference
[A] / [B]
2023 Tesla Model Y Perf. LR AWD 21-inch
[B]
Drive AWD   AWD
Battery 91 kWh* 13.8% 80 kWh*
EPA Range
Combined 260 mi
(418 km)
-14.2% 303 mi
(488 km)
City 277.6 mi
(447 km)
   
Highway 238.5 mi
(384 km)
   
Specs
0-60 mph 3.5 s 0% 3.5 s
Top speed     155 mph
(249 km/h)
Peak power 358 kW    
EPA Energy Consumption (including charging losses)
Combined 82 MPGe: 411 Wh/mi (255 Wh/km) -26.1% 111 MPGe: 304 Wh/mi (189 Wh/km)
City 90 MPGe: 374 Wh/mi (233 Wh/km) -21.7% 115 MPGe: 293 Wh/mi (182 Wh/km)
Highway 77 MPGe: 438 Wh/mi (272 Wh/km) -27.4% 106 MPGe: 318 Wh/mi (198 Wh/km)
Charging
DC Peak charging power: 150 kW
Info: 10-80% SOC in 45 min
  Peak charging power: 250 kW
Weight, Payload and Towing
Curb weight (est.) 5018 lbs (2276 kg) 14.1% 4398 lbs (1995 kg)
Prices
MSRP $64,995 19.8% $54,240
Dest. Charge +$1,800   +$1,640
Tax Credit $3,750   $7,500
Effective Price $63,045 30.3% $48,380

Overall, it seems that Tesla’s price reduction applied this year (thanks to high margins), significantly improved its competitive position and it’s difficult even for Ford to compete. Additionally, the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 (IRA) cuts the Mach-E’s $3,750 federal tax credit.

It’s a really challenging position to be in the all-electric crossover/SUV segment right now, and we are curious as to how it will develop, especially once GM launches its Ultium-based contender.

Tesla appears to have an edge over others, but it must be careful because the supply and demand balance is fragile.

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