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HomeEV & BatteryNew French E-Bike Has A Frame Made From Recycled Materials

New French E-Bike Has A Frame Made From Recycled Materials

Most electric bicycles are considered as “green” alternatives to driving a gas-powered car on a daily basis. While this is indeed true, the materials that go into producing electric bikes – metals, plastics, rubber, and not to mention the batteries – can be very resource-intensive, and may not necessarily be produced in a very environmentally friendly way.

That being said, we’ve seen a lot of sustainability-focused e-bikes from a variety of European manufacturers. For example, we previously talked about the Jean Fourche e-bike that makes use of a design incorporating completely replaceable parts. This time around, yet another French e-bike specialist has developed a new e-bike with a frame made entirely of recycled materials. Ultima is a relatively young e-bike specialist with an eye on sustainability. The newest model is called the Multipath, and it makes use of a unique injection-molded composite resin.

Said resin is composed of a combination of recycled plastic and alloy. This results in a carbon-like material that’s much lighter than steel, yet significantly more durable. It also gives the Multipath a very sleek and seamless look. The bike’s step-through frame is characterized by a thick down tube, flanked by stylized chainstays and a split head tube mount. This makes it look as if the top tube and down tubes meet seamlessly and flow towards the bottom of the bike.

Unique styling aside, the Ultima Multipath makes use of some impressive technology. For starters, it makes use of a Valeo Smart e-Bike System. The mid-drive setup is mounted in the bottom bracket, and consists of a 48-volt, 250-watt electric motor. Meanwhile, a seven-speed adaptive gearbox from Effigear allows you to pedal seamlessly alongside the motor. Battery-tech consists of a 500-watt-hour power pack that’s claimed to offer up to 43 miles on Eco mode. A Long-Range version is also available, and it comes with a 630-watt-hour battery pack that’s good for up to 65 miles per charge.

On the technology front, the Ultima Multipath is equipped with a torque sensor, as well as Bam City shock-absorbing handlebars. It rolls on Mavic 700c wheels shod in Hutchinson tires. The bike comes to a stop with Magura hydraulic disc brakes, which are more than capable of putting the bike’s 25-kilogram curb weight to a secure halt. When it comes to pricing, the standard version retails for 3,449 Euros, or about $3,797 USD. Meanwhile, the long-range variant will set you back 3,699 Euros, or approximately $4,072 USD.

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